Maui Makers is Open for Business

Eat your heart out Ikea. Table folds down for painting and other “messy” work. Folds up and out of the way the rest of the time.

Got workbenches installed in the electronics shop. Thanks Pete and Cole!

 

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The space is shaping up nicely. Watch for the Grand Opening soon.

In the meantime, we are open every Sat and Sun from noon to 5 PM. Drop on by.

We have Basic Arduino every Wednesday from 6 to 9 PM.

We’ll have activities every Thursday. We’ll continue to work on the Forge, build Gameboys from Raspberry Pi, print using the 3D printer, experiment with electrolysis, build robots, and just plain Have Fun Making Stuff in Paradise!

And don’t forget Pi Day: March-14. We’ll be having a special celebration. In honor of Pi, we will open the space at 9:27 AM, and will feature contests and events around all things Pi.

If you like the idea of a Makerspace in Paradise, please support us by becoming a member or donating at the links on the website.

Make Personalized Ornaments

18-Dec-2014, 6-9 PM at St Anthony Jr-Sr High School in Maryknoll Hall, Rm 21 

Tinkering: Build Personalized Christmas Tree Ornaments 

by Laura Ulibarri ($20.00 for non-members/$10.00 for members–includes materials to build 2 ornaments) 

How would you like to make your very own Christmas (Solstice, Hanukkah, etc) Ornament using whiz bang technology or your own creativity? 

We’ll fire up the EggBot to let you print your very own personalized ornament. We’ll provide white ornaments for the eggbot and supplies for various kinds of ornaments. We’ll also have a vinyl cutter and 3D printer on hand, plus ornaments and supplies. 

November 20, 2014 6 to 9 PM Art of Tinkering at St Anthony

We had a great turnout for 3D printing, with 3 printers running. Art of Tinkering is up next for the rest of November. All events are suitable for Family and free to paying members ($10 for nonmembers, make out checks to St Anthony Jr-Sr High School):

November 20, 2014 will be a return to the Art of Tinkering
We’ll build Paper Circuits (http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/paper-circuits)
Bring
–Coin Cell Batteries CR-1220
–Cardstock
–Scissors/exacto knife (age appropriate please)
–Scotch tape

Meeting is 6-9 PM at St Anthony Jr-Sr High School, Maryknoll Building, Rm 21.

Great turn out for 3D Printing! Thanks to Steve Griffin from Boeing for discussing best practices for designing objects for printing.

3D

Membership and a Permanent Home
Maui Makers is still working on a space in Wailuku, but are exploring alternatives, in case that falls through. With the space comes extra bills, so we are rolling out a paid membership structure. Once the bank account gets linked to Paypal, you can pay by credit card on the website. You can also pay by check at a meeting, or contact info@mauimakers.com. For a limited time, memberships will be discounted.

3D Printing–November 13, 2014

We had a great turnout at the monthly meeting with some exciting show and tell. We also have some fun items on tap for the rest of November. All events are suitable for Family and free to paying members ($10 for nonmembers, make out checks to St Anthony Jr-Sr High School):

November 13, 2014 will be 3D Printing Night.
6 PM–set up the 3D printers
7 PM–Steve Griffin, a mechanical engineer from Boeing will be on hand to discuss how to get the best build quality

November 20, 2014 will be a return to the Art of Tinkering
We’ll build Paper Circuits.
Bring
–Coin Cell Batteries CR-1220
–Cardstock
–Scissors/exacto knife (age appropriate please)
–Scotch tape

Both meetings are 6-9 PM at St Anthony Jr-Sr High School, Maryknoll Building, Rm 21.

What Happened at the November Public Meeting
Membership and a Permanent Home
Maui Makers discussed plans for leasing our own space. We have a strong contender in Wailuku, but are exploring alternatives, in case that falls through. With the space comes extra bills, so we are rolling out a paid membership structure. Once the bank account gets linked to Paypal, you can pay by credit card on the website. You can also pay by check at a meeting, or contact info@mauimakers.com. For a limited time, memberships will be discounted. Lorayne Lipps had the honor of being our first paying member. We anticipate being in St Anthony Thursday evenings through December.

Show and Tell
Sevan brought the 3D Printed Air Brush Nozzle he’s been working on:

3D printed airbrush nozzle

Shannon Williams has built a an “oxyhydrogen generator”. It uses electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This converts electricity into a clean burning fuel, and unlike gasoline the only emission released is—water!

Oxyhydrogen generator

magnetic paper

Steve Jenness brought his tricked out motorcycle light:
skull headlight

Upcoming in November

Coming in November

We had some great classes in October and more to come in November!

Maui Makers is still working out the details of the November schedule, but expect to see Arduino, Wearables, 3D printing and more Tinkering. We will be meeting every Thursday at St Anthony and hope to add more dates shortly.

October highlights

Make Your Own Halloween Costume

Halloween Lorrayne
Halloween costume

Art of Tinkering-Scribble Bots and Marble Mazes

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Business Matters

On the business and organizational side, Maui Makers has incorporated as a 501c3, and elected a Board of Directors and Officers. The Board has completed a Strategic Plan and a Preliminary Budget to take the Makerspace to the next level. In that light, you’ll be seeing a few changes in the near future:

A paying membership structure will be set up to help us pay the bills–electrons to keep you informed cost money. We are committed to keeping costs low, but will need your help in pushing to the next level with more tools, classes and a permanent space.

Members will get free or reduced cost access to classes.

We continue to explore space options. We have yet to secure affordable, unlimited access to a permanent home. If you have any leads in this area, please contact the Board at info@MauiMakers.com

3D Printing Talk

On April 8 2014 I (Jerry Isdale) gave an introductory talk on 3D Printing to the Society for Women Engineers (Hawaiian Island Chapter) at the Malcom Center in Kihei. We had about 20 people attending.

3DPrinting April 8 2014 00

This (and other Maui Makers presentations) are available on our public google drive. Look for the ones named “ie 3D Printing” – its there as pdf, odp and google format.

The flyer for the event:
flyer forapril8 talk

And some pics for your enjoyment…

3Doodler creation by Brian Isdale

3Doodler creation by Brian Isdale

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3DPrinting April 8 2014 06

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3DPrinting April 8 2014 09

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U. Hawaii Makery and Makery Cloud

Dr Neil Scott of UH Curriculum Research & Development Group

 

Dr Neil Scott of Univ Hawai’, Manoa College of Education is bringing “making” back to middle schools.  His project, called The Makery, puts a small work center in selected Hawaiian Charter Schools and provides teachers with training and curriculum in the use of electronics, Computer Aided Design (CAD), Manufacture (CAM) and machining (CNC) to foster student interest in STEM.   A key component of the project is integration of culture and arts. The apex project for students is the creation of a Hawaiian Steel Guitar, which they also learn to play.Dr. Scott’s vision extends beyond these islands of innovation to the Makery Cloud – an association of classroom Makery equipped schools, a Central Makery and external partnerships. This vision may provide a terrific opportunity for Makerspaces to partner with schools.

The Makery Project has its roots in Stanford U’s Archimedes Project studying barriers to student learning and use of technology. The project moved to U.Hawai’i in 2003 with Dr Scott with a focus on providing universal access to computer tech. A grant from NSF in 2006 spun up “The Invention Factory” to create a program in hands-on, project based instruction to stimulate interest in STEM careers in underrepresented population. They ran three years of workshops with middle and high school kids. They found kids start off with no idea of what STEM is and why it is important to learn, expected instant gratification, had poor reading/writing skills, very little practical skills or knowlege but they were not stupid – just bored. The kids could learn and make cool stuff if they got the chance.

Dr. Neil Scott and guitar blank

Lessons from these workshops were incorporated into the 2008 rollout of the Makery project at a charter school on the Big Island. Dr Scott and his team setup a 3 year curriculum, tightly coupling theory and practice. (Dr Scott references this pedagogical technique to US Navy Electronics courses created by Van Valkenberg, et al. where hands on lab exercises immediately follow class elements.) The first year taught basics of electronics and magnetism. The second introduced electronics, sensors and microprocessors. The third year introduced CAD/CAM design and fabrication using modern desktop systems. The culmination is the crafting of a Hawaiian Steel Guitar – along with instruction in playing it! Ahh – STEM meets the Arts => STEAM.

Finished Steel Guitar

The latest evolution of The Makery includes the provision of a work center. This nicely designed table includes workstations for electronics, as well as small benchtop power tools, and a small CNC Mill. Storage for tools and supplies is provided under the divided work top. (insert pictures)
[slickr-flickr tag=”makerykiosk” descriptions=”on” flickr_link=”on” sort=”title” type=”gallery”]

Proxxon Chop and Mitre Saw

The power tools from Proxxon may look like toys, but they are actually well crafted professional model making tools, quite well suited to a small workshop. The CNC Micro Mill is a custom system design by the UH Manoa team. They have several different configurations depending on the intended work pieces. The basic desktop system has a fairly small work area (roughly 12″), while a long version can be used for making the guitar bodies.

The latest incarnation of The Makery is the 2011 installation at Kihei Charter School on Maui. Kihei Charter also has a Makerbot Thing-o-Matic. I’m hoping to establish a good working relationship between Kihei Charter and Maui Makers. I think there is great potential for collaboration.

I visited Dr. Scott at his Makery Central at U.H Manoa back on Jan 25th, 2011. He has an impressive lab setup with several larger CNC mills, a laser cutter, etc. Dr Scott was at the 2011 3rd Annual Henry Kalialoha Allen Hawaiian Steel Guitar Festival, doing a workshop with the kids and staff from (Big Island charter school). There were about 6-10 students building guitars over the 3 days. Pictures from both the UH Manoa visit and the Guitar workshop are in my Flicker Set:

[slickr-flickr tag=”UHMakery” descriptions=”on” flickr_link=”on” sort=”title” use_key=”y” ]

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Makerbot Video from NYC Maker Faire 2010

The Makerbot folks were out in force at the Maker Faire NYC with their new Thing-O-Matic printer, frostruders, unicorn plotter and regular Cupcake bots (total around 20 bots!) all printing out and giving away sample printed objects (and snacks!).  Check out the video (about 5 min), and more at the Makerbot Blog.

Lilypad successes, Makers and Education, DARPA Program

LIlypad Embroidery, a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (2.0) image from bekathwia's photostream

This post is an amalgam of several news items I read recently.

First off an article on the LilyPad’s success in bringing women into electronics projects. From a post in BoingBoing:

“MIT’s Leah Buechley and Benjamin Mako Hill recently published a paper called LilyPad in the Wild: How Hardwareʼs Long Tail is Supporting New Engineering and Design Communities, about the success of the LilyPad microcontroller in attracting women to electronics projects. LilyPad is derived from the Arduino open processor, but was “specifically designed to be more useful than other microcontroller platforms (like normal Arduino) in the context of crafting practices like textiles or painting.” The Buechley/Hill paper shows that this was a successful strategy for engaging women makers and contemplates how to use the LilyPad approach to engage with women and girls in other science/technology/engingeering/math (STEM) domains”

Also read Mako Hill’s blog post “Feminism and Microcontrollers“.  Discussions around the net have ranged from positive, to some reactionary that this buys into the sterotypes and women should use electronics in their original form just like hard core hackers do.  Personally, I like the LilyPad and soft circuits. I think that Lilypad Embroidery by Becky Stern is awesome combination of arts. (Image: LIlypad Embroidery, a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (2.0) image from bekathwia’s photostream).

Next up – Makers and Education

There was an NSF sponsored workshop on “Innovation, Education and the Maker Movement” on Monday following the NYC Maker Faire.  It was organized by Margaret Honey of the New York Hall of ScienceThomas Kalil of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Dale Dougherty.  Tom gave the opening speech, which Dale published in his blog.  It gives a good summary of how Makers are changing the economy and education.  I havent seen any other output from the workshop yet. After meeting kids and educators this weekend at the Maui County Fair VEX Robotics Tournament I am even more excited about bringing a makerspace to our island.

DARPA MENTOR bringing fab labs to 1000 high schools

DARPA has a Draft BAA out for a program called MENTOR (Manufacturing Experimentation and Outreach). This program “is part of the Adaptive Vehicle Make program portfolio and is aimed at engaging high school students in a series of collaborative distributed manufacturing and design experiments. The overarching objective of MENTOR is to develop and motivate a next generation cadre of system designers and manufacturing innovators, and to ensure that high school-age youths are exposed to the principles of modern prize-based design and foundry-style digital manufacturing.”  They are looking to deploy digital fabrication equipment (3d printers, cnc, etc) to 1000 high schools globally and encourage partnerships with small business, non-profits, etc.  It looks like they are going to be sponsoring various competitions “in the development of cyber-electro-mechanical systems of moderate complexity such as go carts, mobile robots, small unmanned aircraft, etc.”  I would LOVE to get Hawaii into this program!  Anyone interested in getting involved please contact me.


Silhouette SD paper and vinyl cutter

Paper Fabrication with Silhouette and ModelMaker

Silhouette SD paper and vinyl cutter

Silhouette (aka Craft Robo) paper and vinyl cutter

I recently stumbled upon a great web site for teaching with paper crafting – DigitalFabrication.org is from the Curry Center for Technology and Teacher Education at U. Virginia. The site is mostly about using a Silhouette (aka Craft Robo), a desktop paper/vinyl cutting machine about the size of a small inkjet printer.

Costume CampBells Soup Can

Matt’s costume Campbells Soup Can

I have one of these machines and it is currently on-loan to CrashSpace. It does a good job cutting card-stock and vinyl.  One of the Crashers (Matt Pinner) used it to make a Campbell’s Soup costume with vinyl decals. Matt gave a class on using it back in May. I made some simple vinyl stickers for a car window.

Back to the Digital Fab site … they have some good videos and FAQ on the site about using it for teaching kids using paper cutting/folding (aka Kirigami).  One really cool video is this one showing the creation of a rack and pinion system from card stock.

They use a combination of Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw and a neat tool called fablab ModelMaker. The latter piece is a fairly low cost 3d modeler that drives the Silhouette and is targeted at schools/educational market, they are similar to the new wave of affordable 3d printers that have been made available.  They have a nice video showing kids from Punahou School (Oahu) using the machine with an inkjet printer to create ‘cereal boxes’ to learn math (although they may not know it.

I emailed the creators of ModelMaker and learned they are working on a program to roll the software out to a few more Hawaiian schools.  Also the software can create STL files to output to the Fab@School 3D printer.  Since this is the same format used by Makerbot, I’m going to have to experiment with it for both of my machines!